JPE 600 and 610

Additional sessions will be added throughout the year. Scroll down or click on a course/session title for details.

JPE 600 Course

JPE 600 introduces students to the foundations of ethical reflection in which they will engage throughout the course of their graduate careers. Working within an interdisciplinary context, after participation in this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe and give examples of ethical reasoning in daily life;
  • Differentiate ethical issues from issues of law, regulation, or policy;
  • Identify, assess, and address ethical issues as they arise in the context of research, scholarship, and teaching;
  • Locate resources (local, institutional, regional, and national) for enhancing and preserving scholarly integrity through research, scholarship, and teaching.

 JPE 610: Educational Sessions, Spring 2019

Events are added to the table below as information becomes available. Check back often for updates and new opportunities.

Date/Time

Location

Title

Presenter

Description

Jan 23-24 / 10am- 4pm
Whitehead Auditorium
Mitigating Implicit Bias – Tools for the Neuroscientist
We all have learned stereotypes that unconsciously influence how we see ourselves and others. Like perceptual illusions, some biases persist even once we are aware of them. Implicit bias impacts diverse scientific communities, ultimately limiting the potential of neuroscientists and inhibiting discovery.
In this virtual conference, organized by Ione Fine (University of Washington), Alicia Izquierdo (UCLA), and Yael Niv (Princeton University), you will learn practical strategies for recognizing and overcoming implicit bias and increasing diversity in your labs and institutions, as well as the neuroscience field at large.
From 16 experts, including scientists, lawyers, business and philosophy professors, book authors, and NPR podcast hosts, you will learn about and gain strategies to address:
  • Implicit bias in academia: why it’s there and what we can do about it.
  • Social dynamics.
  • Mentoring in light of implicit biases.
  • Recruitment, selection, and evaluation.
  • Negotiation.
  • Diversifying the pipeline.
Feb 4 / 12-1:30pm
Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library
Outkast & the Rise of the Hip Hop South
(JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium)
 
Dr. Bradley's current book-length project, Chronicling Stankonia: OutKast and the Rise of the Hip Hop South (under contract, UNC Press), explores how Atlanta, GA hip hop duo OutKast influences conversations about the Black American South after the Civil Rights Movement. Chronicling Stankonia stems from her critically acclaimed series OutKasted Conversations, a YouTube dialogue series about the impact of OutKast on popular culture. Dr. Bradley’s work on popular culture and race is published in south: an interdisciplinary journal, Meridians, Comedy Studies, ADA, Journal of Ethnic American Literature, Palimpsest, and Current Musicology. Dr. Bradley's public scholarship is featured on a range of news media outlets including Washington Post, NPR, NewsOne, SoundingOut!, and Creative Loafing Atlanta.
Feb 27 / 4:30pm
TBD
“The Puck Project: A Performance and Ethics Program for Kids.”
In keeping with recent strides to expand professional competencies in the Laney Graduate School, this talk explores a Shakespeare performance and ethics program developed by three graduate students in Emory’s Department of English. The Puck Project, named for a character in William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, is a portable program for children, which focuses on creative play, emotional intelligence, and ethical expression. Geared toward graduate students interested in creating community-based ethics projects, the presentation outlines the logistics of the project, the goals and objectives, and programmatic curricula. The talk will also investigate the ethics of public humanities and the imperative to create community partnerships as a fundamental part of doctoral and scholarly work. In fact, we hope to show that is through reciprocal relationships both within and outside the academy that scholarship and academic labor flourishes best. 
Mar 4 / 3:00-4:00pm
White Hall 206 Sexual Harrasment & Classroom/Workplace Ethics
In the past year, #MeToo and other similar movements have placed a spotlight on the issue of sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace; the academic environment has not been immune to allegations. Graduate students, who play dual roles as student and university employee, face numerous challenges as it relates to sexual harassment given their unique position in the academic setting. In this interactive presentation, which will feature videos and case studies, we will provide an overview of what constitutes sexual harassment and the obligations that graduate students may have to combat it in their academic settings; the legal and regulatory trends that are starting to emerge regarding Title IX compliance; and resources available to those impacted by sexual harassment.
Apr 4 / 3:30-5:00pm
White Hall 208
The Use of Animals in Biomedical Research: Ethical and Practical Considerations
  • Dr. Denyse Levesque
Dr. Denyse Levesque has 30 years of experience in Laboratory Animal medicine and Biomedical Research. She is a clinical veterinarian at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center since 1996 .  Before that she worked in England (Oxford University) and Canada (Laval University) . From this experience, she knows a variety of international rules and regulations involved in the use of animals in biomedical research. She has been a member of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) at Emory since 1997 and is the Vice-Chair of the Committee since 2000. She is the lead veterinarian for the rodent research facilities at Yerkes since 1999 and she is the Associate Director of the Emory-Yerkes Residency Training Program in Laboratory Animal medicine since 2009.
Apr 15 /12-1:30pm
Jones Room, RM 311, Woodruff Library
Performance, Race, and Gun Culture in the U.S. 
(JWJI Race & Difference Colloquium)
The everyday influence of firearms and the increasing polarization of opinions on gun rights between gun owners and non-gun owners is such that even the term “gun culture” is controversial. But the United States as a whole is saturated with guns, practically and imaginatively. It is a society whose public life is compromised by the ubiquity of firearms, whose history is rooted in gun violence, and whose entertainment continues to mine both the present and the past for romanticized representations of gun use. In this Race and Difference Colloquium talk, Lindsay Livingston will discuss the history of anti-blackness that underpins gun laws in the U.S., the ways that performance has influenced gun culture, and how the right to bear arms is and always has been conditioned on proximity to whiteness. 

JPE 610: Educational Sessions (Past Events)

Events are added to the table below as information becomes available. Check back often for updates and new opportunities.

Date/Time

Location

Title

Presenter

Description

Sept 10 / 11-12:30pm
Oxford Presentation Room (Oxford Rd. Bldg.)
Conducting Global Work
This workshop will provide students with an overview of the administrative and legal considerations associated with performing international work. These include, for example, human resources, financial, and travel-related matters, as well as the compliance requirements associated with the range of federal regulations that pertain to this work. The workshop will also include guidance on the resources available at Emory for related assistance, and tools to help students plan and manage global projects.
Sept 12 / 11-12:45pm 206 Administration Bld. How to Translate "Academica" into an Accessible, Meaningful Story Janece Shaffer
Knowing your narrative is key to being impactful, memorable and landing your next opportunity. This session will include an introduction on how to tell a great story, how our brains are wired for stories, how truth is essential in storytelling, as well as series of questions to help you to identify your unifying themes, defining moments and unforgettable details that can be used in interview settings, in developing cover letters and in networking.
Sept 19 / 4-5:30pm White Hall 205
Trends in Research Fraud: Insights from the NSF Inspector General's Office
This presentation will focus on research integrity, fraud and misconduct from the perspective of the NSF Office of Inspector General. The talk will address case studies from actual investigations, look at trends based on case statistics and discuss some root causes of violations of research integrity. The NSF/OIG’s recent review of university Responsible Conduct of Research will also be discussed.
Oct 3 / 3-4:30pm
White Hall 101
Sexual Harassment & Classroom/Workplace Ethics
In the past year, #MeToo and other similar movements have placed a spotlight on the issue of sexual harassment and misconduct in the workplace; the academic environment has not been immune to allegations. Graduate students, who play dual roles as student and university employee, face numerous challenges as it relates to sexual harassment given their unique position in the academic setting. In this interactive presentation, which will feature videos and case studies, we will provide an overview of what constitutes sexual harassment and the obligations that graduate students may have to combat it in their academic settings; the legal and regulatory trends that are starting to emerge regarding Title IX compliance; and resources available to those impacted by sexual harassment.
Oct 4 / 4:30-6pm Jones Room (Woodruff Library) Beyond Black & White: Multiculturalism in America
In 2000, the US Census Bureau allowed Americans to classify themselves into more than one racial category for the first time. In that census, 2.5% of Americans identified with more than one race. Ten years later, that number increased to 2.9%.

These numbers both foreshadow the increase in Americans who will likely identify as multiracial in the future and perhaps underestimates the number of people who currently have recent ancestors of different races. According to the Pew Research Center, 6.9% of American adults have parents or grandparents of different races. In 2015, 17% of marriages in the US involved partners of different races.

Some of these changes reflect differences in self-reporting. Some reflect differences in attitudes regarding the acknowledgement of interracial relationships. In either case, these changes reflect the reality Americans of mixed race heritage have always been a part of America.

In this dialogue, we want to explore what it means to be multiracial from a social, legal, historical and cultural sense. Our panel of interdisciplinary experts have spent years considering the question of mixed raced identity and are sure to provide helpful and incisive commentary.
Oct 17 / 4-5:30m Miller Ward Alumni Housoe Conscious collaborations: what's next for interpersonal violence prevention and response at Emory
The Office of Respect is hosting an interactive workshop for members of the campus community led by Dr. Chris Linder – author, academic researcher, and equity and diversity educator. Dr. Linder will facilitate discussions about current Emory-specific, off-campus community level, and national efforts to educate and respond to sexual and interpersonal violence through an intersectional framework. Participants will also be able to identify opportunities for collaborations within the campus community and additional ways to get involved in the movement to end violence. Reception and meet and greet with Dr. Linder to follow workshop.
Oct 24 / 1-2:30pm Oxford Rd Bldg Auditorium Understanding What Constitutes Research Misconduct and Best Practices in Using Source Material to Avoid It
This session will provide students who are new to the U.S. educational system with valuable information regarding research misconduct and the use of source materials in academia. Participants will learn about Emory’s compliance policies related to fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism. For writers for whom English is a second or additional language, the workshop will also provide practical strategies, tools, and resources to ensure proper acknowledgement, paraphrasing, and citation of other authors.
Nov 26 / 12pm
Jones Room (Woodruff Library)
Racial Palimpsest & the Transformation of Race
Dr. Parham's Race and Difference Colloquium talk examines the emergence and social consequences of living under the influence of a racial palimpsest by engaging in a two hundred year comparative-historical examination of the migration and integration of white and free black refugees fleeing the Haitian Revolution for New Orleans in the early nineteenth century and tracing the contrasting paths their descendants take into the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.
Nov 28 / 12-1pm
102 Center for Ethics
The Ethics of Brain Computer Interfaces for Communication of Emotion
Melody Jackson (GA Tech) will speak on the ethics of brain computer interfaces for communication of emotion. She currently works with Thad Starner of Google Glass upgrades for people with neurodevelopmental disabilities.
Dec 10 / 12-1pm
102 Center for Ethics
The Ethics of Predicting Mental Illness from Social Media
Munmum De Choudhury (GA Tech) will speak on the ethics of predicting mental illness from social media.