Requirements

The requirements for the Certificate in Translational Research fall into three areas: 

  1. Course Requirements
  2. Electives
  3. Other Requirements
  • Initial Meeting with Dr. Vin Tangpricha to design individual rotation linked to a clinician in student’s field of interest
  • MSCR 761 – Introduction to Clinical and Translational Research – 2 credits 
  • CPTR 500 – Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 2 credits 
  • MSCR 593 – Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues of Responsible Clinical and Translational Research – 1 credit 
  • MSCR 594 (A) and (B) – Grant Writing – 2 credits 
  • CPTR 502 – Biostatistics for Translational Research – 2 credits 
  • MSCR 591 – Community-Based Participatory Research and Health Disparities – 1 credit
  • MSCR 592 – Research Colloquium – 1 credit 
  • MSCR 595 - Health Services Research - 1 credit 
  • CPTR 501 – Translation to Clinical Medicine – 2 credits 
  • Journal Club – meets monthly in collaboration with MSCR program and allows interaction with physician-scientists, PhD level scientists interested in careers in clinical investigation 
  • IRB Rotation – attend and observe 1 committee meeting. Students may attend 1 IRB meeting at either Emory, Georgia Tech, or Morehouse School of Medicine
  • CRN Rotation - students learn about the resources available through the CRN for CTR (including those that would benefit their own research), meet with CRN directors, with the PIs of NIH-funded and IRB-approved CRN projects, attend CRN Safety Advisory Subcommittee meetings, and be linked with CTR investigators and research coordinators working in their area of interest using CRN sites in Atlanta (e.g., Emory, Grady, Children’s Healthcare, Hope Vaccine Clinic, HIV Clinic, etc).

Course Requirements -- 14 credits

The certification program requires sixteen credits (14 core credits plus two elective credits) of didactic training in the Laney Graduate School of Emory University. The courses are be taught by faculty at Emory and Georgia Tech.

Electives -- 2 credits

A variety of electives across the collaborating institutions are available. These include MSCR courses at Emory and Morehouse School of Medicine, courses at the Emory Rollins School of Public Health and in the Morehouse School of Medicine MPH program, graduate level courses in the biomedical sciences or biomedical engineering at Emory, Georgia Tech and Morehouse School of Medicine. All electives must be pre-approved by the CPTR Program Director.

Other Requirements Ongoing Throughout 2-Year Program

Didactic and individualized Clinical Research Network (CRN) rotation - students learn about the resources available through the CRN for CTR (including those that would benefit their own research), meet with CRN directors, with the PIs of NIH-funded and IRB-approved CRN projects, attend CRN Safety Advisory Subcommittee meetings, and be linked with CTR investigators and research coordinators working in their area of interest using CRN sites in Atlanta (e.g., Emory, Grady, Children’s Healthcare, Hope Vaccine Clinic, HIV Clinic, etc). This provides opportunities to see sites of CTR, interact with CTR coordinators, and learn how study subjects are accessed and enrolled into clinical and/or translational research studies. Throughout the rotation, students are required to attend seminars, workshops and conferences which complement their area of research interest and career goals.

  • Journal Club – meets monthly in collaboration with MSCR program and allows interaction with physician-scientists, PhD level scientists interested in careers in clinical investigation
  • IRB Rotation – students individually attend and observe 1 committee meeting. Students may attend an IRB meeting at Emory, Georgia Tech, or Morehouse School of Medicine.

Course Descriptions

MSCR 761 Introduction to Clinical and Translational Research [CTR] (2 credits)
Introduction to CTR and analytic medicine for clinical/translational investigators. Resources needed for designing and implementing CTR are discussed as well as translational blocks and methods to overcome these blocks. The course also covers protocol design, hypothesis development, and gathering of evidence, modeling and statistical inference including Bayesian inference. Other topics include design of clinical trials and observational studies, human subjects issues, special populations, adverse effects, and pharmacokinetics.

CPTR 500 Fundamentals of Epidemiology (2 credits)
This course introduces the principles and methods of epidemiology; it also will include concepts and methods used for population-based research. Epidemiologic study designs and data collection methods are described as well as approaches to data analyses. The concepts of bias and confounding are explored with examples from the clinical epidemiology literature.

MSCR 593 Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues of Responsible Clinical and Translational Research (1 credit)
Examines concepts inherent to the ethical and responsible conduct of CTR and covers a number of important human subjects research training issues. A case-based approach is emphasized. Topics include: overview of ethics and the history of the protection of human subjects; informed consent and vulnerable subjects; development of data and safety monitoring plans and data and safety monitoring board (DSMB) charters, conflicts of interest; IRBs, HIPAA, ethics of genetic testing and gene therapy, and ethical issues in research in the developing world. All students are also required to complete the Emory IRB Human Subjects training program (online course from the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative [CITI]).

MSCR 594 Scientific and Grant Writing (2 credits)
This course is focused on developing writing skills for peer-reviewed publications and competitive grants. Effective scientific communication and writing skills are reviewed and discussed as are key aspects of the NIH (and other organizations’) grant review process. Each student prepares a grant proposal for extramural funding which is critiqued by the course directors and their mentors. The final product is a grant (e.g., predoctoral NIH National Research Service Award [NRSA]) tailored to the individual student’s dissertation research and which may be submitted for funding. Students also meet individually with the course directors who provide individualized feedback on the grant preparation in collaboration with the student’s mentoring team.

CPTR 502 Biostatistics for Translational Research (2 credits)
This course introduces statistical concepts and analytical methods with special attention to data encountered in the biomedical sciences and biotechnology as well as translational research. It emphasizes the basic concepts of study design including clinical trials, quantitative analysis of data, probability, and statistical inferences.

MSCR 591 Community-Based Participatory Research and Health Disparities (1 credit)
This course, developed by the Morehouse School of Medicine and Emory Master of Science in Clinical Research (MSCR) programs, introduces and emphasizes the concepts of “T2” research. It also incorporates social science and behavior theory concepts in understanding of health disparities and research in this area; principles and historical roots of effective community engagement and partnership in CTR; community and academic perspectives in developing and sustaining collaborative, multidisciplinary research; practical issues in conducting community-based participatory research across the continuum of research including planning, implementation, evaluation, dissemination and translation; and ethical issues and current community-based participatory research projects at Emory, Morehouse School of Medicine, and the Atlanta area.

MSCR 592 Clinical Research Colloquium (1 credit)
Seminar-style course that covers a wide array of practical issues in CTR including: research administration and grants management; federal funding process; IRB and HIPAA; Conflict of Interests; Legal Aspects of Translational Research; Drug Discovery; Industry interactions (drug discovery and device development); Multidisciplinary research and Team Science; Mentor and mentee training; Translational Research Informatics, Health Services and Implementation Science Research.

MSCR 595 Health Services Research (1 credit)
This course provides students with an understanding of the nature, methods, scope, magnitude, and impact of Health Services Research (HSR). Students gain a better appreciation for the importance and relevance of HSR in improving healthcare delivery as well as key tools employed in HSR and areas of funding (e.g. Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute [PCORI], Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality [AHRQ]).

CPTR 501 -- Translation to Clinical Medicine and CIN Rotation (2 credits)
This is a key component of the CPTR program. PhD graduate students typically have little or no practical experience interacting with patients or study subjects who have the disease(s) relevant to their research interests. The goal is to provide the students with a new set of experiences relevant to both their understanding of disease and their research interest(s) and to illuminate the potential impact of high-quality CTR in clinical outcomes of individuals with disease. This course will provide students with both didactic and experiential learning. This includes:

  1. Introduction into Clinical Medicine – This course provides initial training and practical experience in common pathophysiologic diseases including exposure to patients and study subjects with disorders involving the cardiac, pulmonary, neurologic, endocrine system, gastrointestinal tract and to inflammatory or infectious disease conditions.
  2. Individualized Clinical Medicine rotation - The course instructor meest with each student prior to the course to discuss the student’s future research career plans and will design a rotation based on the individual needs of the student. Students are linked with a clinician working in their area (e.g. who may also serve on their mentoring team) and round with a clinical service at Emory teaching facilities (e.g., a student interested in Neuroscience research will round in the Neurology inpatient and consult teams). The clinical internship can occur either in the inpatient and/or the outpatient setting. Students also have opportunities to observe diagnostic or therapeutic procedures (e.g. imaging, surgery, physical examinations) in tertiary and community-based research sites; understanding and observing state-of-the art hospital-based analytical technologies; shadowing additional multidisciplinary inpatient and/or outpatient teams caring for patients with disorders or diseases of interest; and mentored examination of histologic sections of human tissues with clinical investigations faculty of the Emory Clinical Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Department.
  3. Didactic and individualized Clinical Research Network (CRN) rotation - Students learn about the resources available through the CRN for CTR (including those that would benefit their own research), meet with CRN directors, with the PIs of NIH-funded and IRB-approved CRN projects, attend CRN Safety Advisory Subcommittee meetings, and are linked with CTR investigators and research coordinators working in their area of interest using CRN sites in Atlanta (e.g., Emory, Grady, Children’s Healthcare, Hope Vaccine Clinic, HIV Clinic, etc). This provides opportunities to see sites of CTR, interact with CTR coordinators, and learn how study subjects are accessed and enrolled into clinical and/or translational research studies. Throughout the rotation, students are required to attend seminars, workshops and conferences which complement their area of research interest and career goals.